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Warren Flight School by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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099Warren One_Nikon D 200 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr. JT4C DSC_0098_resized

Warren Flight School

Established – January 5, 2013

007Warren One_Nikon D 200 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.PREFLIGHT INSPECTION WALKAROUND DSC_0006_resized

Rayniel Saldana does his walk around preflight inspection before working the controls of the radio-controlled helicopter.

Nikon D 200 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

I never got to sit on the kitchen floor and run my own electric train set. My childhood ended too quickly. Years later, I got to buy a train to run around the Christmas Tree, but it wasn’t the same.

 

I didn’t get to spend hours working with the scenery. I didn’t have the opportunity to hone my skills for meticulous details by carefully matching the paint scheme to the appropriate railroad or box car.

 

I did get some great toys. I had a wonderful childhood. Sometimes, in life, it seems you seek out those opportunities you missed.

 

I never got to fly a radio-controlled aircraft as a child. My childhood ended too quickly.

 

Since I am The World’s Oldest Kid, I usually manage to find away to stroll past the toy department of a store. In December 2011, I bought a radio-controlled helicopter, but, the Christmas Day guests got to fly it.

 

The 2011 Christmas Day Guests did not return in 2012, but other activities of the day kept the family busy. A couple of days later, I decided my nephews and nieces and I would try to fly “Saldana One YF,” I began the refueling operation, which consisted of plugging in the charger and waiting for it to charge.

 

The model aircraft burst into flames and the aircraft removal consisted of it being moved to the backyard “boneyard” to naturally become part of the ecology.

 

The happy ending is a few days later, I did add a new radio-controlled aircraft to the inventory.

 

Warren Flight School set up on the Barangay Baras Road, January 5, 2013. The radio-controlled helicopter flagship, “Warren One” sat ready to fly.

 

Rayniel Saldana became my “Chief’, which meant I let him take control of checking out the aircraft and making sure it was ready for flight.

 

Like an aviation warrant officer, once the chopper checked out, he worked the controls and took it up for a “check ride.”

 

Vanissa Saldana and Junea Tanahale watched and took their turns.

 

Their “Uncle Sam” watched.

 

Double A batteries don’t last long; not even eight of them. However they “logged” about two hours of flight time.

 

Their “On The Job” radio-controlled “pilot training” consisted of getting familiar with the controls, which averaged about 10 minutes per pilot.

 

Junea displayed her “pilot’ skills by flying along the Barangay Baras Road and her ability to gain altitude that put the helicopter about 20 feet in the air and flying over my head.

 

The first day of Warren Flight School was an outstanding success.

 

FLIGHT PAST THE COCONUT TREES 100Warren One_Nikon D 200 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr. JT4D

 

Junea Tanahale “pilots” “Warren One” a radio-controlled helicopter past the coconut tree of Barangay Baras, Leyte, Republic of the Philippines, January 5, 2013. Nikon D 200 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

All the photos of this session of Warren Flight School can be found at Samuel Warren Picasa Web Albums.

Warren One

https://picasaweb.google.com/115529281361827670221/WarrenOneJanuary52013

 

 

Sam

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons license.

The Toy I Lost . . .At Sea by Samuel E. Warren Jr

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Common Sense procedures will protect your fleet of toys

 

The Toy

I Lost . . . At Sea

TEXACO TOY TANKER_1961_resized

Texaco S.S.North Dakota

Toy oil tanker by Wen Mac Company

In 1961, the Wen Mac Company produced this wonderful toy for kids. I got to enjoy my ship for about two hours. The majority of that “play time” was worry. I watched it bob about on the waters of the “Wild Warren Sea” in the southwest Missouri Ozarks.

 

These fleets of wonderful toy ships sometimes ride anchor on the virtual ebay sea. Aspiring young captains and first mates set course to surf or sail the cyber sea over to ebay for more information.

 

by Samuel E. Warren Jr,

 

The beauty of my childhood is there were great and affordable toys that parents could buy for their kids. There were numerous toy companies in the United States and toy companies overseas that shipped toys to the United States.

 

There were all types of great and interesting toys. The toys were rubber, pressed tin, metal, plastic, battery operated and early remote control toys. The electronic toys, gadgets, gizmos and computer games were still 20 to 30 years in the future.

 

Kids in the 1950s and 1960s still had to rely on their imaginations, creativity and the manual labor of sitting on the kitchen floor or in the yard to play with your toys.

 

My toy box in the garage had become a miniature salvage yard of toy cars and trucks that had failed the child stress test of playtime. I didn’t abuse or misuse my toys. Like Real World automobiles and aircraft, sometimes the advertising does not live up to the realities of day to day use.

 

I had some toys that I was particular about because I enjoyed playing with them and they were fun to use. Usually those toys, ended up in the house. The toys I was extremely particular with went in a refrigerator-sized cardboard box in a corner of the laundry room. Those were the special toys that I only brought out when other kids came to play or at special times. The games were on top.

 

I knew I was a lucky kid. I was also an only child, which meant I didn’t share my toys on a day to day basis. I did not have a lot of ships in my toy inventory.

 

When we moved to the farm in Missouri, I “forward deployed” the toys I didn’t want to live without. The yearly trip to Texas, more toys ended up “deployed to Missouri.” The pedal car, pedal tractor and the tricycle, eventually got “reassigned” to Missouri.

Daddy’s two trips a year, he would bring me toys, especially as presents at Christmas.

 

Samuel E. Warren arrived in Galena for his Fourth of July visit in 1961. Daddy brought me a beautiful plastic toy ship. I opened the box. It was a beautiful Texaco tanker ship, the .S.S. North Dakota.

 

The red body wide hull displayed a wide ribbon of black around the top of the vessel. The white wheelhouse and accessories on the deck made the ship look like a real ship.

 

I put the D batteries in the ship and rushed over the rocks to the farm pond.

 

Common sense means I should have taken the time to read over the manual. I should of waited until I had “brand new” D size batteries for the ship. I should of gotten a good night’s sleep and then went to the pond to “christen” the ship with her maiden voyage.

 

I turned the ship on, the tiny propellers spin. I set the ship in the water. Ripples of water stream around the ship.

 

On her maiden voyage she was underway across the wide cow pond. I watched proudly. In the middle of the pond, the ship slows and seems to drop anchor. The engine had quit. The batteries were wore out. The ship sat in the middle of the pond, “dead in the water.”

 

I should of used new D batteries. I made a dumb decision.

 

In childhood, patience is not something that comes naturally.

 

Momma had always told me not to throw rocks in the pond. After all, you pay someone to dig a deep hole to let the rain fill up for cattle, so you don’t want rocks back in the water. Sometimes lime would have to be added to the soil to help maintain the water in the pond.

 

This pond had always been a problem. It just didn’t seem to want to hold water. I looked at my “elite of the fleet” vessel “lost at sea” in the middle of the pond. The afternoon sun was thrusting out the last rays of daylight. I tried to weigh my options.

The pond was deep enough to swim a horse, I couldn’t walk out and get the ship. From time to time, in this farm pond,you would see a snake swimming along.

 

 

A ripple effect should generate enough energy to push the ship forward toward the shore. The theory seemed practical.

 

I threw rocks in the water to create ripples to guide the ship to shore. The ship bobbed about on the artificial waves I kept picking up and tossing in rocks. The ripple effect worked for awhile.

 

Black Angus and Polled Hereford cattle strolled to the pond to drink. Some wondered out into the pond and created ripples that helped to sail the ship. Then, the cattle went back ashore.

 

I became anxious and picked up bigger rocks to toss in the water. Unfortunately, some of those rocks generated intense ripples. My rock shelling of the ship was a bad decision.

 

My rescue operation had turned into an accidental aerial bombardment. The rocks plopped into the water and generated large exploded splashes of water around the ship’s bow and stern.

 

The rock flak wasn’t generating ripples; it was creating seismic tsunamis that were lashing into the toy ship’s hull. The plastic tanker was bobbing about. I didn’t think it would be a problem. I thought, the toys was naturally correcting it’s course based on the nature of the water.

 

I should have relied more on science and my common sense than my optimism. I saw the ship was shifting in the water. I made the bad decision to keep “shelling” rocks at the toy ship.

 

Wide webs of water splashed against the ship’s hull a few more times. Then, the ship listed over on it’s side. I stopped throwing rocks into the water. The ship laid on it’s side in the water for a few moments. I hoped it would move closer to the shore.

 

A few moments passed. Suddenly, I watched the toy ship slip beneath the waves.

 

My North Dakota tanker slipped beneath the water of The Wild Warren Sea.

 

As of December 2011, the toy Texaco tanker ship the .S.S. North Dakota still rests on the bottom of that farm pond in Missouri.

 

The moral to the story is: “Play with your toys and enjoy them.” If you take care of your toys like any tool, you will have them for years to come. If you abuse or misuse your toys, then, all you will be left with is a memory.

 

Sam

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons license.

Written by samwarren55

December 24, 2012 at 7:29 PM

Massive Moving Sale Idea – Toy Box for Kids

with 6 comments

by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

All the unsold merchandise has been returned to storage.  The Weiser Tent Service, of Monett, Missouri came and got the big top.  Now, that a day or so has passed, I have had time to reflect on what worked and what did not.  Overall, I believe the sale was an outstanding success.  I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the shoppers who came to our massive moving sale.

My wooden crate toy box in August offered kids the chance to dig into the box for a toy. But, there were not that many kids at the yard sale. Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Back in August, when we decided to have a yard sale, I noticed my old wooden crate toy box.  As a young boy in Houston, Texas, I had thrown my toys in the crate.  I had an imagination and I played hard with many of the toys.  I stressed tested many of the toys to the limit.  The toy box from the garage in Texas only represented a fraction of the toys that made the trip to Missouri and ended up in storage.  Toys, other than mine. found their way into the toy box.

I looked at the old toy box and wondered if kids in the 21st Century of 2011 were as curious as a boy of the 20th Century back in the late 1950s.  Before I started school, I would dig in the box in the garage and play for hours with the hodge podge of various toys from plastic cars to green army men.

I had noticed at garage sales and yard sales that I had been to that if there were no toys to interest children, then, parents weren’t always able to concentrate on browsing all the items.  I wondered if the big toy box setting out in the open would occupy children’s interest, while their parents and grandparents shopped.

Not to sound like a bureaucratic number crunching bean counter, but August didn’t provide very much in the way of data because the majority of the grown up shoppers came without their kids.  September was a different story.  I was ready to put out the toy box and watch to see if kids would dig into the toy box.

“Junior, I sold your toy box,” said Donna, my cousin, on the first day fo the Massive Moving Sale.  I freaked !  My eyes went wide.  I felt my mouth drop open.  “I hope you don’t mind.  A lady wanted the wooden crate, so I sold it.  Your toys though I put in another box,” explained Donna.

I took a deep breath and smiled.  Now, I could carry on my experiment and see if kids even paid attention to the toy box.

Friday, I came up with the idea to put my Star Trek dolls on a table and place them where cars going by would see them.  Later that afternoon, a long, big, yellow Galena school bus sped past enroute to Abesville.  I noticed a multitude of tiny faces pressed against the window glass and staring out at the dolls and the tent.  After school, some parents stopped by with their kids and when I told the child to pick a toy they wanted out of the toy box . . . I didn’t have to tell any child twice.

The kids dug through the toy box with the exuberance of an archaeologist and the discerning eye of a Rodeo Drive shopper.  I had worried that I did not have any toys that would interest little girls.  However, through the years, some girls had left toys around here that found there way into the toy box.

In September for the Massive Moving Sale, my toys ended up in an old computer box. The kids that came with their parents and grandparents dug into the box like frenzied shoppers at A Day After Thanksgiving Christmas Shoppers Sale. Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Judging from the kid’s expressions, they  enjoyed being able to get a toy.  It doesn’t get any cheaper than, “Free !”  Everyone loves a bargain, even a kid.  It seemed they also enjoyed digging through the toy box to see what they could find.  My analysis may not be scientific; but, being a kid at heart – I believe the idea worked.

Sam

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