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WAR ! The Reality Of Life World War I Anniversary Editorial

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Anniversary Of The End Of World War I

War !

The Reality Of Life

French soliders in a frontline trench during World War I_resized

French Soldiers At The Front  The French soldiers are in a trench in the woods of Hirtzbach, France June 16, 1917.

by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

November 11, 2012 – Today is the Anniversary of The End of World War I. The important lesson of World War I is “The reality of War is a persistent fact of ALL human lives throughout your life on earth.”

 

World War I ended November 11, 1918 In the eleventh month, on the eleventh day, at the eleventh hour and at the eleventh minute. The reason why world leaders were so precise in their calculations to sign the formal documents to end this global war is because they really truly wanted this to be the Last War Of Humanity. Unfortunately, they forgot “Human Nature”, which mean people disagree and the major differences of opinion lead to War,” – Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

President Woodrow Wilson of the United States of America made a beautiful quote about, “World War I being the War to End All Wars.” He was wrong. The brilliant American Democrat forgot – human nature.

 

The Lesson Of Life In The Real World is Life. To live your life, you have to learn how to survive. The art of daily survival involves compromise. We learn at an early age how to live with our parents and in our local communities. By the time we are adults, we learn how to “compromise” to put aside our personal beliefs to earn a paycheck and make a living. Throughout life, we learn that “compromise” is a valuable tool to guarantee our daily survival. The major glitch is it only takes one man, one woman or one nation to throw a monkey wrench into “The Global System” and War emerges from the history books and into your Life.

 

All Wars Are Global

 

The Crucial Significance Of World War I is that it proved to every man, woman and child on planet earth, “War Is Global.”

 

War has always been global because the effects of a War in any nation of the world at any time is history is always felt in other nations. In the ancient world it simply took longer because there was not real time communication and efficient transportation systems.

 

What “shocked” the Citizens Of The World about World War I was “how quickly” the events in Europe exploded and involved people who had never even heard the word, “Austria.”

 

Sunday, June 28, 1914 – A completely unknown Serbo Croatian college student had two loaded firearms and shot a completely minor duchess and a completely minor archduke, who might not even ascended to a royal throne because of the issues of royalty and ascension to the throne in question.

 

The reason why the assassination of a relatively unimportant member of royalty by an unimportant college student spiraled quickly out of control came down to one word, “Treaty.”

 

The Hungarian archduke had been assassinated and Hungary turned to Austria to honor a treaty commitment. Austria honored their treaty commitment and invaded Serbia. Germany had a treaty commitment with Serbia. Germany honored her treaty commitment and invaded Belgium.

 

Nations and their empires really had no choices because “their hands were tied” with the treaty commitments, which forced “a military response.” Suddenly, all the nations “honoring” their commitments had grouped themselves into two major forces: “Allies” and “Central Powers.”

 

Weekend War

 

The Weekend War”, that began on a summer Sunday afternoon “wasted” more than 9 million lives with more than 70 million people in military uniform being “slaughtered”, and more than 60 million European military people were “murdered” in a senseless War because one college student, criminal, wannabe political terrorist shot and killed a relatively minor world leader, who was only in line for the throne because a cousin died and his father rejected the Hungarian throne.

 

There were important issues before the world leaders of the day of all the nations and empires, but, it was a “bungled” assassination attempt that “accidentally succeeded” because the archduke’s driver took a “wrong turn” and the college student recognized the royal couple and took advantage of the “accidental opportunity” to quickly “get his guns off.”

 

Insecurity Of National Security

 

The unimaginable death toll of World War I happened because nations for their own security had invested in War technologies that would protect their “National Security”, and the weapons worked so well that a majority of the globe’s infrastructure was destroyed along with millions of citizens.

 

World War I War Weapon

 

The tank made it’s debut during World War I. A global irony of World War I is the many empires had invested in weapons to protect their “National Security” and the fall-out from World War I lead to national revolutions and civil wars to where only the British Empire survived as an empire.

 

Today most global citizens will not observe the Anniversary Of The End Of World War I because “it is an old war” and “it happened so many years ago.” Turn on your TV and watch the evening news, if you see a tank in any of the video coverage, then, remember, that the “tank” was first used in World War I.

 

Nuclear, Biological, Chemical – NBC

 

NBC is an American television network, but, more importantly, NBC on a global scale are the letters that relate to “Nuclear, Biological and Chemical”, which are three major elements of War weapons that destroy human life in the blink of an eye.

 

While you watch the evening news, if there is video coverage of a War somewhere in the world, listen closely to find out if any type of “Poison Gas” was used on the victims.

 

World War I Austrian corporal Adolf Snickelgrubber was exposed to at least one and possibly more “poison gas attacks”, during World War II and by the start of World War II, he had changed his name to: “Adolf Hitler” and had started a War.

 

Iraqi Dictator Saddam Hussein used a biological or chemical “gas” weapon to “kill off” Kurdish citizens of Iraq.

 

Poison Gas, biological or chemical, is a World War I technology whose real time effect still trumps the Internet and all the real time communication and transportation developments of the world because the gas is breathed in or can enter through the pores of the skin.

 

Killing Kids

 

War requires humans to fight and often die. The longer a War goes on, the more lives are lost. The American Civil War allowed the rules about “enlistment age” to be lowered so that “teenagers” could be “drafted” or “enlisted” to fight in the War in the mid-1800s.

 

By World War I, nations simply “looked the other way.” All armies in World War I, called ironically, “The Great War,” used children soldiers and birth certificates, enlistment age and proof of age requirements were ignored for boys and girls as “manpower” was needed to wage the war.

 

Watch For War

 

Today, ever Citizen Of The World should celebrate The End Of World War I because it ended and the four years of suffering and dying stopped.

 

The Citizens Of The World should realize that World War I’s Daily Legacy is “A War Ends, But The Technology Lives On And Human Nature Will At Times Be Ready For War.”

 

Remember, the sergeant named Warren reminded you War is a reality of all human life. Enjoy your life. Enjoy Peace. But, remember, War is always just a heartbeat away. Rely on your common sense and daily survival skills because you never know, where in the world some twit is going to do something stupid that will ignite events that inflame a global War.

 

 

Happy End Of World War I.”

 

Sam

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons license.

“Happy Birthday, Gilbert – My Aide-de-camp !”

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Happy Birthday, Gilbert –  My Aide-de-Camp !

Gilbert Roa, my nephew, an education major at Leyte Normal University. In the background is a swinging bridge in a nearby barangay. Gilbert is the type person, you want by your side when you cross those swinging bridges of Life.
June 12, 2012, Republic of the Philippines Independence Day is also Gilbert Roa’s 18th Birthday. My nephew, Gilbert, exhibits the qualities a person usually finds in a military aide-de-camp assigned to a general or admiral. Canon EOS 40 D Photo by Samuel E, Warren Jr.

By Samuel E. Warren Jr.

World history from the Roman General Julius Caesar to United States Army General Herbert Norman”Stormin’ Norman” Schwarzkopf , who, served as Commander of the Coalition Forces in the Gulf War of 1991 and Commander of U.S. Central Command, always records the battles, honors, achievements of the great military leaders, who have made a definite difference in global civilizations and history.

While history is quick to record the names and deeds of the great generals and admirals, who changed the world, sometimes one of the people closest to the great men or women go completely unnoticed by history.

Sometimes a diligent search of military history might reveal the name of the person, but more likely, you will have to find someone on active duty or a veteran, who served at headquarters to learn the name of the individual.

In the prehistoric global civilization of humankind, before the Internet and cell phones, general officers and navy flag officers had a special individual assigned to them: The Aide-de-Camp.

The United States Armed Forces like many nations armed forces base their traditions, ceremonies and

Gilbert Roa, at this point, in his life, plans to become a teacher. He is a student at Leyte Normal University in Tacloban City. Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

rituals on the lessons of history, so while the French, Russian or British military may not use the same words for the position – there is a very good chance that their generals and admiral still rely on a certain individual to accomplish some task on their behalf

The unsung “Aide-de-camp” to, my knowledge, has never had books written about them, Hollywood movies made of their life stories or even an exhibit in a museum, but, the aide-de-camp was an indispensable person to a general or admiral because while the senior military officer was engaged in official duties like planning how to use thousands of men and resources from combat boots to tanks to win a battle or the overall strategy to win a war; it was the aide-de-camp, who handled mundane tasks for the general.

While United States Army General Dwight David Eisenhower is meeting with Allied generals and admirals to plan the D-Day Invasion, you can bet the general’s aide-de-camp was the one worrying about the date to pay the general’s utility bills and phone bills back home in the States and worrying about if the protocol officer at the next base, the general is scheduled to visit has made all the arrangements for the general to present medals to the men and women to be honored.

No doubt, United States Army General William Childs Westmoreland, in command of United States military operations in the Vietnam War, was dedicated to trying to convince President Lyndon Baines Johnson to send military forces into Cambodia and Laos to close the Vietnamese supply line of the Ho Chi Minh Trail.

In the course of official duties, communication with the President of the United States of America was an absolute necessity. General Westmoreland had to have daily communications with army commanders in the field, air force commanders on the bases, naval and marine corps commanders afloat or on a base. And, then, of course, in a democracy, a general and admiral have to be ready to answers questions from senators, congressmen, and the international news media. If there are any hours left at the end of the day, that time is called: sleep.

Thus, an aide-de-camp for General Westmoreland would have had to take care of the mundane tasks of life like making sure the general’s uniforms gets to and from the cleaners. And, if the general is to meet with the president, senator, congressman or another commander, then, the collar brass, insignias, name tag, stars on the uniform, and “the fruit salad”, i.e. the ribbons have to be in arranged in order on the dress uniform. If the uniform of the day is “fatigues,” then, the aide-de-camp would be the one to make sure that all the crest patches are current and not showing any signs of age or wear.

The military aide-de-camp in the United States Armed Forces was usually a junior officer from 1st lieutenant to major.

In a nutshell, the aide-de-camp’s mission was simple – “take care of the boss”- which meant the general or admiral’s day would not be wasted.

In the civilian world, businessmen, politicians, and some leaders have the secretary to rely on, but the aide-de-camp didn’t clock out at 4 p.m., and go home. In recent years the civilian world leaders have adopted the aide-de-camp position to positions like “personal assistants.”

But, there is one area between an “aide-de-camp” and a “personal assistant” that will probably always be different and that is esprit de corps and loyalty. Military people understand the value and the integrity of those concepts as a way of life. In the civilian world, the idea of “loyalty” usually translates to some boss getting a lawyer and having an employee sign a “nondisclosure agreement.”

Of course, as a sergeant on active duty, I would work with various senior officers’ aide-de-camps, but I would never have one of my own.

The nice thing about retirement is sometimes Life allows you to enjoy your fantasies in the Real World.

The Birthday Cake was baked by the Twilight Bakery in Tanauan. Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Upon returning to the Republic of the Philippines, I needed an individual that I could trust to help me in day to day matters – my own “aide-de-camp.”

My nephew, Gilbert Roa, a student at Leyte Normal University is my aide-de-camp. Whenever I need the answer to a question or want to understand the proper way of doing something the way it is done in the Philippines, my nephew – “Gilbert is The Man With The Plan.”

Today, June 12, 2012 is Independence Day in the Republic of the Philippines and also the birthday of my nephew, Gilbert.

Happy Birthday, Gilbert !

Tito Sam

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