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Posts Tagged ‘Philippines

Baras Basketball Snapshots by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Baras Basketball

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by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Saturday, April 6. 2013

 

Saturday afternoon, my wife, Christy Warren, Esmeralda Tanahale, Christy’s sister, and other family members are at home at One Warren Way preparing the food for Elson Tanhale’s 15th Birthday Party.

 

My Nikon digital single lens reflex camera is charged up and I have shot some birthday celebration photos already.

 

I decide to walk along the barangay road. At the basketball court, I notice the local boys are shooting hoops.

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These snapshots are ,by no stretch of the imagination, basketball shots that would interest the editors of “Sports Illustrated.”

 

However, everyone has family somewhere on the planet.

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An Overseas Filipino Worker might be homesick to see family back in the province.

 

A Filipino or Filipina working and living in Manila, might be wondering about family and friends back in Leyte.

 

If an OFW, someone in Manila, or a Filipino or Filipina living in the United States recognizes a family member or friend in the snapshots, then, these shots will have served their purpose.

Sam

 

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Written by samwarren55

April 10, 2013 at 2:47 PM

Business Creativity In The 21st Century Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Business Creativity In The 21st Century

 

Jun Jun Tanhale, a rice farmer, and a “trike” motorcycle operator, of Barangay San Antonio, Palo, Leyte, Republic Of The Philippines, places empty coconut shell husks on the fire to cook a pot of rice cake.

 

The husks essentially work like charcoal briquets they become hot, burn slowly and consistently to give off an amount of heat that allows the food to cook through and through.

 

While the actual procedure is a fairly common cooking procedure in the rural Philippines; it points out that Filipinos tend to be creative in finding ways to stretch the budget and make the ends meet. Jun Jun and his wife, Esmeralda have six children. Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Rice cake cooks in the pot. Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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What Time Is The Next Ferry To Manila ? Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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What Time Is The Next Ferry To Manila ?

Elaysa Tanhale, 2, of Barangay San Antonio, Palo, Leyte, Republic of the Philippines, looks up like a tiny traveler checking the time and destination of the next ferry sailing to Manila, complete with her overnight bag. Actually, she came to visit her Aunt Christy and Uncle Sam Warren in Barangay Baras, April 6, 2013.

Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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“Sammy” The East Texas Country Boy Workaholic

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Parental Portrait for Christmas

 

  Sammy

The East Texas Country Boy

Workaholic

Sammy_resized

Sammy”

Samuel E. Warren, an east Texas country boy, had his own style in life. In appearance, this Capricorn man was meticulous about his dress. In the era before “Wash and Wear”, he had his dress shirts taken to the cleaners to be ironed and pressed. He wore a tie bar to keep the starched collar of his shirt down. He taught his son, Sam Junior, “how to tie a Windsor knot” to wear a neck tie. His dress shirts had French cuffs, which usually had a matching tie clasp in his personal jewelry box that contained his business jewelry. In his 40s and 50s, he usually wore a stockman’s Stetson hat. In his youth, like many men of his era, he wore a more traditional business fedora, like in this studio portrait. My father believed you should, “Dress For Success.”

 

 

by Samuel E.Warren Jr.

 

Samuel E. Warren had the blond crew cut and blue eyes. He stood six-feet and one inch. Middle age gave him a weigh in the area of around 200 pounds.

 

His pressed western shirts and creased denim jeans were the visual confirmations of military service – His civilian clothes had the appearance of a military uniform.

 

He earned two “Silver Stars” in World War II.

 

I never heard daddy speak of the war to anyone. Momma told me that through the years, he had talked to her about the things that happened in the war.

 

Black cowboy boots, the “Lady’s Head Liberty Silver Dollar” in the brown western belt and the diamond Masonic ring identified him as, “Sammy” to his friends and family.

 

He loved his Chevrolet and GMC pickups. Daddy’s traditional gray stockman’s Stetson hat, western shirt, boots and denim jeans, identified “Sammy” as a Texan through and through.

 

Sammy could be considered shy in social situations. He preferred to listen rather than speak. My Scorpio Uncle Leo, an oil company executive, usually led the conversations between the family men. Uncle Audrey will smile and interject humor into the discussions. Daddy would listen and might on occasion add a comment or two.

 

Papa” Warren loved to talk and tell stories. “Mama” Warren, had polio, which forced her to use a crutch. She was quiet natured and seldom raised her voice unless it was at something “Papa” Warren said. Daddy, obviously, inherited Mama Warren’s quiet side.

 

Aunt Bill, Daddy’s eldest sister had an award-winning smile. She had a big heart for kids and animals. Her laugh was loud, definite, and would echo throughout a room.

 

In Houston, or east Texas, Momma and Aunt Bill would go grocery shopping together and run household errands. They were more like sisters than sister-in-laws.

 

My Scorpio “Aunt Pet” always seemed distant to me. Aunt Bill and Uncle Audrey had no children of their own, but, “Aunt Bill” never missed an opportunity to spoil me and I always enjoyed the attention.

 

In Texas in the late 1950s and early 1960s, kids were still expected to be seen and not heard. In a room of adults you never knew if you were an extra end table or an unfinished robot.

 

Papa, Mama, Aunt Bill and Uncle Audrey always made me feel like a welcomed miniature adult. Uncle Leo liked to scowl and tease me, Daddy expected me to act like “daddy’s little man.”

 

Momma had briefed me on “Southern protocol” from an early age, so I could be a “kid”, but, I always had to be respectful and polite around my adult elders. I never had to worry because I was never off Momma’s “mother radar.”

 

Most definitely, “I am a Momma’s boy.”

 

Daddy was an East Texas country boy, who grew up on the farm. I heard stories that as a young boy he worked in the cotton fields and sugar cane fields of east Texas.

 

Momma said daddy worked as a short haul trucker making runs from Gilmer. Tyler, Kilgore, Gladewater and Mount Pleasant until Uncle Sam “drafted” him to fight in World War II.

 

Yellowed V-mail correspondence from east Texas revealed one girl back home in Thomas, Texas, during World War II, had an interest in my father. The attractive brunette, dressed in a navy blue sailors’ suit dress even posed for a photograph of her standing by an old Ford ton and a half stake truck.

 

Uncle Sam “drafted” Sammy and sent him to Fort Chaffee, Arkansas for “boot camp.” After basic, Uncle Sam shipped daddy out to the European Theater of Operations and later to the Pacific Theater of Operations for World War II.

 

Thanks to the United States Army Signal Corps, daddy put some of the first land line telephone lines in the Philippines and picked up the skills of an electrician, during the war.

 

After the War, Daddy got on out at Cameron Iron Works in Houston. He worked part-time, which meant, most nights for George Cook as a bartender or bouncer at “Cook’s Hoedown Club.”

 

Later, he worked part-time at the “Dome Shadow,” a club near Houston’s famous Astrodome.

 

Daddy liked to talk to people, but, he spoke low and sometimes didn’t finish his sentences as though he just got tired of talking and stopped.

 

Lodge work” excited Daddy. He would get excited about the humanitarian activities of the Reagan Masonic Lodge, his lodge. He looked forward to getting the monthly issue of the magazine in the mail. He kept his Masonic apron in the elegant locked glass bookcase in the living room.

 

Daddy proudly displayed framed photographs of himself and his lodge brethren on the furniture in the living room.

 

Besides the Masonic Lodge, daddy the reserved Texan, only showed emotion if he got mad. He cussed. Then, of course, his message was distinct and crystal clear. Daddy was not a skilled communicator and usually let momma do the talking in social situations.

 

He had the “hard work” ethics of Americans of his generation. A Capricorn, daddy definitely embodied his Zodiac sign because he worked hard all his life and everything he ever got he earn by elbow grease and the sweat of his brow.

 

Capricorn rules earth, real estate, agriculture and basically, anything to do with land. Daddy grew up on the farm. He served in a major global war of human history that changed the borders and infrastructures of nations for generations and his job at Cameron’s was to supervise an ore taken from the earth being turned into liquid to be poured into dies to create tools.

 

One factor astrologers point to about the sign of Capricorn is that people born under the sign usually have to work hard all their lives. Daddy did

 

Sammy loved to spend the money he earned. His philosophy of finances was,“You can’t take it with you.”

 

While daddy’s carefree financial philosophy has merit on the surface; it doesn’t work in the long haul. To live bold without a regard for cost means you have to be making a ridiculous amount of money each day or you will have to be a “workaholic” most of your life.

 

After World War II, Samuel E. Warren always had a “part-time” job, in addition to his regular job until his death in 1978.

 

Daddy worked too hard; he never took the time to enjoy his life. The true irony is he never made the opportunity or took the time to truly enjoy the money he earned.

Sam

 

 

Hat Links

 

Samuel E. Warren, my father, loved his hats. From the time I was a small boy, I remember my father wearing a Stetson. It was a gray western hat with a small brim that was called, “The Stockman.”

 

Stetson

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stetson

 

 

Samuel E. Warren, my father, and my uncles, Leo Greene and Audrey Irwin were “Texans”, who in the 1930s and 1940s usually wore a hat. There was the dress “Zoot Suit” style for Friday and Saturday evenings with a wide brim and there was the more traditional everyday business hat, which was known as a “Fedora.”

 

Fedora

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fedora

 

Opal M. DeLong Warren, my mother, worked as the chief waitress at the Cook’s Hoedown Club in Houston, Texas. The dress code for the club required the women to “dress western.” The white hat of momma’s uniform came from the American Hat Company.

 

Samuel E. Warren, my father, also had a white western hat and a black western hat from the company. Inside all the hats was a humorous name card the size of a post card. It listed the person’s name on the card. The words at the top of the card stated: “Like Hell, this is your hat ! This hat belongs to:”

 

The American Hat Company

http://www.americanhat.net/

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Word Warrior Warren Word Works “Black Market Movies”

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Word Warrior Warren

Word Works

Black Market Movies”

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Arghh ! “Pirated DVDs”

This is a selection of “Pirated DVDs” and “Black Market Movies” bought in Manila, Tanauan and Tacloban City, in the Republic of the Philippines. You hear about “Black Market Movies” in Asia,  They seem to be as common as “rice in the Pacific” because they can be bought in public. The true challenge isn’t finding a “Black Market Movie”; the challenge is to find a “Legitimate Movie.” Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

The cliché about, “Once a reporter, always a reporter” is true in my case. I have always been curious. As a child, I would annoy my classmates because whenever I had a question, I would raise my hand and expect an answer from the teacher.

 

I knew from childhood I would be a reporter because I was simply “too curious” to be anything else in life. I grew up on the old black and white movies where an actor like Cary Grant would portray the crusading reporter, who would get the “Truth” and the presses would roll.

 

Naturally, reading about Clark Kent and the Daily Planet in the Superman comic books only added to my conviction and passion to satisfy my curiosity.

 

The honor of serving in the military enhanced my role as a reporter. I didn’t have the “Big Red S” on my chest, but, I had my own “blue suit” to serve “Truth, Justice, and the American way.”

 

As a senior citizen, I am still curious.

 

When I get interested in an idea, I begin researching it for my blog, which is, essentially, my “Daily Planet.”

 

When Christy and I moved to the Philippines, we had to wait for our “household goods” to sail from the United States. We both love movies. While we waited, I looked around to see where I could buy some movies. I began to hear about, “Black Market Movies,” “Pirated DVDs,” and “Illegal Movies.”

 

I never imagined finding a “legitimate movie” would be an epic quest, but, it became one.

 

In the Republic of the Philippines, the “Black Market Movies” are everywhere and sold out in the open in public.

 

The real challenge is to find a “legitimate movie or TV episode” that you can rent or buy and not end up with a “Pirated DVD.”

 

Fortunately, our “legitimate” movies arrived. But, when a new release hits the theaters; “Where do you go to buy the legitimate movie ?”

 

I still have no answer to this question. I do have a passion to try and find an answer. I have begun my research. Time to “beat feet to the street” and try to find an answer.

 

Is there an answer to the proliferation of Black Market Movies in Asia or is it simply a cultural business difference with the West ?

 

Now, that Christmas seems to be front and center, I imagine my research will have to go on the back burner for a few days.

 

I would appreciate my regular readers keeping this issue in the back of their minds,then, come the new year, maybe, we can have an answer to the issue or at least know that there might be some issues in life that society, in general,simply shrugs off.

 

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Black Market Movies

Sucker Punch” The Buyer

You put down your hard earned dollars, pesos, baht or yen on the counter and think you are getting a discount or catching the movie “On Sale.” You get home and pop the DVD into the player and realize, “You’ve Been Had, Dad.” Instead of getting a professional movie, you get a video that usually looks like it was shot by a blind man and recorded by a deaf woman. Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Sam

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Jeepney Photos Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Jeepeys Saturday Afternoon in Tacloban City Nikon D 70 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.0010_resized

Jeepney Photos

 

Editors, bloggers and webmasters, if you need photographs of jeepneys for your publication, blog or website, you might want to check out my “The Samuel E. Warren Jr. I Love Jeepneys Photo Album on Picasa.

 

Jeepneys lack the debonair style of the American “muscle cars” and would never be mistaken for a foreign race car. Yet, the Philippines’ jeepneys are flexible, versatile vehicles that have the toughness of an American farm pickup, the useability of a small school bus, the reliability of a sedan and the originality of the most unique taxi cabs in the world – found only in the Philippines.

 

Internet surfers, feel free to browse the photo album to see if you can find any photos that you would like to download to use as a desktop background or to package as your own desktop theme.

 

You might want to check the photo album every few days because I like to add photos to it . . .after all,

“I Love HEART_Nikon D 70 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr. 0008_resized Jeepneys.”

 

Sam

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The Samuel E. Warren Jr. I Love Jeepneys Photo Album

 

https://picasaweb.google.com/115529281361827670221/TheSamuelEWarrenJrILoveJeepneysPhotoAlbum

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Photography Patrol Bamboo Pole Pedicab Transport

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Bamboo Poles Pedicab Transport

Tuesday afternoon in Barangay Baras these bamboo poles were being transported using a pedicab. The bamboo poles can be used to make furniture or as power poles. Nikon D 70 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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