Sam I Am Blog

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Posts Tagged ‘Palo

The Boatmen Photography Patrol Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Photography Patrol

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The Boatmen

Two barges move massive amounts of white sand for use in concrete along the Pinagbahaan River in Barangay Cogon in Palo, Leyte, Republic of the Philippines. This photo shows the massive amounts of sand on the river bank and gives an overall landscape perspective of this afternoon photograph.

 

Both of these photos were shot from a moving “trike”, which explains why the push pole in the bottom photo hides the one boatman’s face and the electric line in the photo helps to hide the second boatmen’s face. This bottom photo shows how low in the water the barge rides the current.

Nikon D 70 Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Tropical Storm Ofel

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Tropical Storm

Ofel

Hell And High Water

  in

The Leyte Gulf

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Tropical Storm Ofel

Tropical Storm Ofel slams the waves against the sea wall below the MacArthur Landing Memorial in Palo, Tanauan, Leyte, Republic of the Philippines, Wednesday, October 24, 2012.  About the time this photograph was taken the weather bureau was reporting that the storm should be centered over the Leyte Gulf.  Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Leyte Landing

68th Anniversary

October 20, 1944, United States Army General Dougas MacArthur and the official party waded ashore in the Leyte Gulf to begin “The Liberation Of The Philippines.”  Two Ausralian warships and warships of the United States Navy’s 3rd Fleet and 7th Fleet sailed toward the Philippine Islands to engage the Imperial Japanese Navy in “The Largest Naval Battle Of World War II “ and “The Largest Naval Engagement Of Human History To The Present” in these waters from October 23 through October 26 in “The Battle Of Leyte Gulf.”  On the 68th Anniversary, the statues of the MacArthur Landing Memorial remain resolute as Tropical Storm Ofel unleashes nature’s bombardment on the Leyte Gulf.  Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

Tropical Storm Ofel MacArthur Landing Palo Tanauan Leyte 007 Nikon D 100 Photo by Sanuel E Warren JrToday, October 24, 2012 – I had been researching and working on an article for my blog since October 20 about “The Liberation Of The Philippines” and “The Battle Of Leyte Gulf.”

 

I needed some photos to go with my story. I could of used file photos that I had shot, but I wanted “fresh” photos. I decided last night, come “Hell Or High Water” I was going to get the photos. I never realized at the time what an “prophetic”description that phrase would be.

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At the MacArthur Landing in Palo, Tanauan on the island of Leyte, the weather unleashed “Hell,: with a muddy brown sky and murky brown water that erased the horizon and created a backdrop of a muddy brown sky and murky brown water that delivered a hail of intense hard driving pellets of rain.

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The “High Water” became the vicious ocean waves that were crashing over the lower sea wall beneath the MacArthur Landing Memorial.

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Hell And High Water” arrived in the Leyte Gulf and her name, “Tropical Storm Ofel.”

 

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In the morning, I had heard in passing about a tropical storm headed for Leyte. Typhoons in the Philippines are like Tornadoes in Missouri, you keep your eyes and ears open and stay aware of the developing weather conditions. If the weather goes bad, then, you cancel your plans for the day and do something else.

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This morning, when we left Barangay Baras, on the island of Leyte, the skies were gray and everything was wet. The wind didn’t seem to be blowing all that bad around 10:30 a.m.

 

Tacloban City was the first stop on the itinerary. Naturally, I ran a few errands before I decided to go do my “photo shoot” at the statues in Palo.

 

By around noon, I came out of the Gaisano store and headed to the Santo Nino Church to pick up some flowers.

 

When a ship goes down at sea or an aircraft is lost at sea, people place a wreath upon the waves as a memorial tribute.

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World War II, the Pacific Ocean claimed many lives during the The Battle Of Leyte Gulf. It seemed placing a wreath of flowers on the water would be an appropriate way to salute the Allies soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen who perished in that battle.

 

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Around 1 p.m., I stepped out of the vehicle into a hard rain. In a few minutes, every stitch of clothes I had on was saturated with water. The wind was strong. I walked toward the statues and wondered, “Maybe, I should come back tomorrow.”

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I raised my camera and began shooting photos. Ramon and Ranyiel sat in the van and watched my every step into the weather.

 

It felt like something other than rain pelleted me. It fell like hail. It made it hard to keep your head up and look into the sky.

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I had left the flowers in the vehicle to concentrate shooting the photos I had on mind. The cliché “Man Against The Elements” was a reality. I was drenched to my skin. The rain fell hard.

 

I used the wet shirt tail of my polo shirt to wipe off the water spots on the lens. Since I always keep a UV Filter on the lens of the camera any scratches end up on a $14 filter and not the more expensive lens.

 

The wind off the ocean kept pushing me farther inland. Still, I managed to move around enough to take the photos I had in mind. The wind, like an insistent mother, kept trying to move me. I finally clasped a hand to the chrome railing down a few steps to work my way down the side steps, since the wind was really trying to move things.

 

I looked up and watched it fall. Clang! One of the tall flagpoles beside the main flagpole fell straight down and the metallic clang echoed. I walked quicker, but more cautious to the vehicle.

 

I spent a few minutes, wiping off the camera lens. I was soaked through to the skin. I could not have gotten any wetter than if I had stepped into the ocean in my clothes. The height and violent nature of the waves made it obvious no one would be getting out into the Pacific Ocean today.

 

The Battle Of Leyte Gulf from Oct. 23 through October 26, 1944 had devastated “The Enemy”, 10,000 men, 27 ships, and the majority of their aircraft.

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I had not been able to get a wreath of flowers, so I looked at the small bouquet. The bouquet of flowers were all I could offer to recognize the sacrifices of the Allies, who lost six ships and 2,800 men.

 

With my camera and the flowers I made my way back to the statues. The crashing waves of water against the lower sea wall made it evident, no one would get anywhere near the beach or Leyte Gulf today.

 

I stepped back and turned to go. I noticed the platform in front of the statues. I placed the flowers on the platform.

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In honor of the men of the USS Gambler Bay and the other Allies ships and aircraft that disappeared beneath the waves, I left the flowers on the platform in front of the statues.

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Nikon D 100 Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

Once, I returned home,I logged on to the Internet to read the latest tropical storm update:

 

PAGASA

Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration

 

 

Hourly update on OFEL
At 1:00 p.m. today, 24 October 2012, Tropical Storm "OFEL" was estimated based on satellite and surface data over Leyte Gulf (10.5°N, 125.5°E).

 

 

The weather bulletin confirmed that Ramon, Ranyiel and I had been on the “front lines” of Tropical Storm Ofel unleashing her wrath on the Leyte Gulf

Sam

 

Weather Link

 

PAGASA

Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration

 

http://www.pagasa.dost.gov.ph/

 

 

Samuel E. Warren Jr.’s

Editor’s Note

 

October 24, 2012 — We returned to Barangay Baras and learned the power had went out about 10 minutes before we got home due to the storm. No problem My Dell laptop had a three-hour charge on the computer battery. I put the Compact Flash card in the card reader and while the pictures downloaded to to the laptop’s hard drive, I began writing the story.

 

I wrote as fast as I could and double checked some of the facts on the Battle of the Leyte Gulf. Alas before I could finish the story, the laptop flashed the warning of low power and went out a few minutes later.

 

October 28 2012 – The power briefly come back on around 4:30 p.m., and only lasted about 20 minutes in Barangay Baras. A transformer blew in Barangay Cameri and wiped out the power in a total of six barangays

 

October 29. 2012 – The power in Barangay Baras came back about 7:45 p.m.

 

October 30. 2012 – The copy and photos finally finished for this article I finally get to publish it – on “My Birthday.”

Sam

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons license.

I Envy United States Army General Douglas MacArthur Editorial

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I Envy

United States

Army

General

Douglas MacArthur

UNITED STATES GENERAL OF THE ARMY DOUGLAS MAC ARTHUR_army.mil-59621-2009-12-22-131255

United States Army

General of the Army Douglas MacArthur

Promoted to "Five-Star" rank , December 18, 1944. Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in the Southwest Pacific Area. U. S. Army Signal Corps Photograph.

by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

World War I , in the 20th Century, taught the Citizens Of The World that War is Hell On Earth and no nation or person is “neutral.” World War I proved that War had evolved from nations with disagreements to a force that engulfs the world in a matter of days or hours.

 

World War II, in the 20th Century, taught the Citizens Of The World, Hell On Earth is always just aMV5BMTkzMDQxNzEyMl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMjcxMTAyMQ@@._V1._SX333_SY475_ heartbeat away.

 

The DVD cover shows Actor Gregory Peck in the role of General Douglas

MacArthur in the 1977 movie, “Mac Arthur.”

World War II divided the nations of the world into Us versus Them. World War II confirmed that any War, like fire, can quickly spread and engulf nations in a global holocaust that consumes everything in it’s path.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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World War II’s Gift: The A Bomb is the constant reminder that when nations do not deal with issues, then, a violent force will always wait in the wings to settle those issues.

 

The A Bomb and nuclear weapons are not the threat – they are the reminder that when War becomes a global inferno, then, an Armageddon event is needed to end the War.

 

Every generation forgets or fails to learn : “The Eternal Lesson Of War is Hell On Earth demands you to find the courage to survive the death and destruction around you to survive and live your life.”

 

______________________________________________________

 

The U.S. Army’s Philippine Scouts

These were General Douglas MacArthur’s soldiers—the guys who fought America’s first battle of World War II. The Philippine Division. Probably the best trained and possibly the best prepared U.S. Army division at the outset of the war.”

Quote is the lead paragraph for the story on

The U.S. Army website

 

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Shoulder sleeve insignia of the United States Army’s Philippine Division, 12th Infantry Division. The head of the water buffalo symbolizes the Philippines. The colors red and gold represent the island’s Spanish colonial roots.

______________________________________________________

 

 

In my lifetime, there has hardly been a day, when I did not pick up a newspaper, turn on the radio or TV or log on to the Internet to read about, yet, another – War.

 

War is eternal.

 

War is inevitable.

 

War is a major event of Human Life.

 

When The Citizens Of The World forget or ignore The Lessons Of War, then, the next War is only mere seconds away.

 

The Korean War happened too quickly after World War II for people to understand that World War II was the global event that should of taught The Citizens Of The World that War can be “The Extinction Event For Human Life.”

 

I admire the American Generals And Admirals of World War II because they knew there had to be a way to quickly end the global pain and suffering. Those military leaders and their troops fought to find a way.

 

I salute General Eisenhower, General Patton, General MacArthur, all the Allies military commanders and troops for the courage it took for them to wage the battles and campaigns needed to end World War II.

 

October 20, 2012 was the 68th Anniversary of the Leyte Landing. October 20, 1944, United States General of The Army Douglas MacArthur and Filipino leaders waded ashore at Palo, Leyte, near Tacloban City, Republic of the Philippines to begin the Liberation Of The Philippines.

 

Meanwhile, the Allies forces were gearing up in the waters of the Pacific for The Battle Of Leyte Gulf, which would become, “The Greatest Naval Battle In The History Of Global Naval Warfare,” in terms of the men, munitions, planes, bombs and ships available to be used to fight a battle at sea.

 

To date, “The Battle Of Leyte Gulf Is The Largest Naval Battle In The History Of The World.” The battle raged in the waters off the Philippine islands of Leyte and Samar from October 23 through October 26, 1944.

 

I have always envied General MacArthur because he kept his promise and set free a Pacific nation from the grip of a sadistic tyrant – Emperor Hirohito.

 

Sam

MONUMENT

TO THE

FILIPINO SOLDIER

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Nikon D 100 Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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World War II Battle Of Leyte Gulf Links

 

 

  Leyte Samar Daily Express

http://leytesamardaily.net/2012/10/simple-memorable-celebrations-mark-68th-leyte-gulf-landings/

 

The 68th Leyte Gulf Landing Anniversary:

A Celebration of Victory

http://antacloban.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/the-68th-leyte-gulf-landing-anniversary-a-celebration-of-victory/

Tourism office calls on Leyteños to set up wartime museum

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/tacloban/local-news/2012/10/17/tourism-office-calls-leytenos-set-wartime-museum-248511

 

Battle Of Leyte Gulf

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Leyte_Gulf

 

US Army Center Of Military History Battle Of Leyte Gulf

http://www.history.army.mil/brochures/leyte/leyte.htm

The U.S. Army’s Philippine Scouts

http://www.army.mil/asianpacificsoldiers/history/phillipineScouts.html

Philippine Scouts Heritage Society

http://www.philippine-scouts.org/

Forgotten Soldiers’ – The Philippine Scouts

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forgotten-soldiers-the-philippine-scouts.htm

 

US Navy – Naval History And Heritage Command

http://www.history.navy.mil/

 

US Marine Corps History Division

http://edm-sepublic.documentservices.dla.mil/USMC_Oral_History/

 

US Coast Guard Historian’s Office Battle Of Leyte Gulf

http://www.uscg.mil/global/search/default.asp

 

U.S. Merchant Marine in World War II

http://www.usmm.org/ww2.html

US Navy Ship – USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55)

http://www.public.navy.mil/surflant/cg55/Pages/default.aspx

World War 2 Facts

Information and Facts on the Great War

Battle of Leyte Gulf

http://www.worldwar2facts.org/battle-of-leyte-gulf.html

Ahoy – Mac’s Web Log

Naval, Maritime, Australian History and more

Mackenzie J Gregory

http://ahoy.tk-jk.net/macslog/BattleofLeyteGulf.23-26Oc.html

Military History Online.Com

The Battle for Leyte Gulf Revisited
by Irwin J. Kappes

http://www.militaryhistoryonline.com/wwii/articles/leytegulfrevisited.aspx

Mabuhay Tacloban City

Monument To The Filipino Soldier

http://www.tourisminthephilippines.com/city/Tacloban/historical-places/tacloban-monument-filipino-soldier-palo-picture-01.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Saga Of Ramon’s Trike

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The Saga Of Ramon’s Trike

by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

As a child in Houston, Texas, I had a tricycle. It was made out of heavy black metal. It had a large wheel in the front and two smaller wheels on the side. I would zip up and down the concrete driveway of 313 East 26th Street on my tricycle.

Of course, when I got stationed in the Republic of the Philippines in 1988, I quickly learned the word, “tricycle” had a totally different meaning in the Philippines.

I could still zip up and down the road to Clark Air Base in a tricycle. But, it wasn’t my “trike” and it always cost me a few pesos

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Saturday afternoon, Ramon explains the neat features of his tricycle to his family. 

Canon EOS 40 D Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

Monday, March 5, 2012 – The sun rises in the Republic of the Philippines and the morning breeze of Leyte carries the sound of a new tricycle through the coconut trees.

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Ramon bounces along on this older motorcycle to try and use it to move sacks of coconuts.  In the Philippines, a motorcycle can sometimes be expected to perform like a farm pickup in the United States. 

Canon EOS 40 D Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Saturday, Ramon Q. Saldana Jr., took delivery of his new tricycle. While Ramon got his new Honda TMX 155 motorcycle, February 24, 2012, he had to wait for the sidecar modification.

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February 24, 2012 — Ramon is proud of his new motorcycle.  He is happy to pose for a picture.  Of course, once you get the motorcycle, then, you have to wait for the sidecar to be built to transform the motorcycle into a tricycle. 

Canon EOS 40 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Once Ramon got his motorcycle, he would need a sidecar modification to turn the motorcycle into a “trike.” In the Philippines, a tricycle, often called a “trike,” is a motorcycle with a sidecar that is used to transport passengers and products.

Ramon visited a local welding shop, in a nearby barangay, famous for their sidecar modifications. His name was placed on the waiting list behind the other orders. It appeared, at the time, that it might be the second week of march before the shop could begin work on his motorcycle for the conversion. Ramon picked the color and the design and in a matter of days, his new tricycle was ready to ride.

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Ramon gives his sister, Christy Warren, and his brother, Rafael a ride in his trike. 

Canon EOS 40 D Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Of course, vehicles have to be licensed and registered. The paperwork procedure proceeded along on schedule. Unfortunately, electricity in Leyte is not always reliable.

Everyday for a week, Ramon, went to the appropriate government office. However, the persistent power outages kept the computers off line. Finally, the last week in June, with all the paperwork completed,

 

Ramon was finally able to heed, “The Call Of The Open Road.” Now, Ramon get to zip up and down the road on his trike taking passengers to their appointments and taking kids to and from school.

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Ramon heeds “The Call Of The Open Road” and motors along the highway on his trike. 

Canon EOS 40 D Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Sam

“Happy Birthday, Marife !”

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Happy Birthday, Marife !

May 29, 2012

by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

The Birthday Girl – Marife Saldana Roa, the birthday girl, opens her birthday cards. The kids and Tito Sam used their best creative efforts to make some birthday cards for the special day. Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Marife Saldana was about 14 when she came to Angeles City and her sister, Christy, enrolled her in Dau Academy.

The Sisters — Christy Warren and Marife Saldana Roa, the sisters, talk and joke for a fe moments, before the birthday party gets underay. Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

I met Marife, when she was the teenager.

Like her friends in the school’s white uniform blouses and required green skirts they talked about the things teenage girls talk about like: boys.

It was the late 1980s, so cell phones had yet to be invented, thus, classmates talked about things on the way to and from school

“Girl Talk” — Pina Gempis and Marife Roa talk in the kitchen. Pina spent the morning, cooking spaghetti and pancit canton for the birthday party. In the Filipino culture, pancit canton is the Filipino dish you expect to find at a birthday party because tradition states that pancit canton is a symbol of a long life. Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

and on weekends because “texting” had yet to be invented.

May 29 is Marife’s birthday.

Even as a teenager, Marife had a smile and a quiet personality. In 2012, Marife is married to Ninoy Roa and the mother of four boys: Gilbert, Glen, Chrismar and Mac Mac.

“Happy Birthday to you.” — Christy Warren lights the candles on the birthday cake.
Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Today was a milestone, other than age. The last time Christy bought a birthday cake and had a birthday party for her sister, Marife, she was 16. Christy returned to the Republic of the Philippines in December 2011, and this was the first opportunity, she had to have a birthday party for her sister Marife.

Although Marife Saldana Roa is my sister-in-law, I have always believed, “She is the daughter I should of had.”  As a teenager, Marife was always respectful to her elders, did well in school, and never hesitated to use her English skills to tell me what was going on in school.  As a teenager, she always treated me like a father and since our return to the Philippines, Marife continues to be the daughter I should of had.

The Good Morning Bakery Birthday Cake. Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

May 28, Christy went to the “Good Morning Bakery” in Palo and ordered the birthday cake. Christy looked through the pictures of the birthday cakes and picked out the design.  The selection of the birthday cake became a Major Military Operation because I went along to order the birthday cake.  I’m one of those people, who as a child was always “picky” about the kind of food I ate and “where I ate.”  As a senior citizen, I remain “picky” about my food from birthday cakes to anything I eat.

While the bakers were discussing the cake with Christy, I had questions about the size and flavor.  Christy remembered that Marife like vanilla.  One of the baker’s assistants brought out a cake pan to show up the size.  I took one look and figured three people would get birthday cake and everyone else would watch them eat.  I smiled and asked bigger.  The assistant then explained that they had a cake pan about twice the size.  I nodded, “Texas size.”

When selecting the novelty to place on the cake, Christy remembered as a teenager that Marife liked the TV show, “Darna.”  Darna is a Filipino super heroine, whose American counterpart is “Wonder Woman.”  Like “Wonder Woman” in the United States, “Darna” is a character in the Philippines that is always portrayed by the most beautiful Filipina actresses of every generation in the movies and on TV.  Darna has always been a positive role model for Filipina girls.

Back in the 1980s, whenever a Darna TV show or movie came on, I plopped down on the sofa beside Ramon and Marife to watch.  Thus, the Darna super heroine doll stood tall in a corner of the cake.

The Good Morning Bakery birthday cake was pleasing to the eye.  I was impressed by the taste.  The vanilla cake was moist to the tongue.  Regardless of where I have been in the world and had birthday cakes or wedding cakes, one thing I always remember is that sometimes the cakes are dry.

Once the cake comes in contact with your tongue you dash like a man in the desert for the nearest source of liquid to quench your steel wool thirst.  Christy overcomes the dryness problem with cakes by using butter to keep the cake moist.

Christy Warren serves up a helping of birthday cake and pancit canton to Edwin Mora. Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

I do not know how the Good Morning Bakery kept this cake moist, but it passed my tongue test and I enjoyed the cake.  Naturally, I would of liked the cake to be a tad more moist, but, when it comes to food I am “picky.”  I am a Scorpio, but, when it comes to food, my taste buds and stomach are obviously Virgo in the extreme – my eyes and digestive system give new meaning to the phrase, “Attention To Detail” and the word, “Perfection.”

The smiling faces of the attendees and the second-helpings were a testament to the flavor of the birthday cake.  And the icing was a favorite with the adults as well as the kids.

Marife is not the only Saldana relative, who celebrates May 29 as the birthday. Randy Abano, a second cousin, is a close family member, who also shares the Gemini day.

All Western astrological signs have their positive and negative values and Gemini is a sign often considered to be “moody.”  However, Marife and Randy remind me of  the famous American Gemini, who served as a United States Navy PT boat commander, who went on to become a great American President – John Fitzgerald Kennedy.

Before the birthday party began, Ranyiel Saldana handed one of the pet pigeons to Randy Abano to examine. Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Randy is a quiet young man, who is always ready to help out.

Perhaps, he is “picky” about dating because he is still a single man.

Before I conclude this birthday article, I leave my readers two points to ponder.

Point Number One

In my lifetime, at birthday parties, I have always noticed that usually it seems the birthday boy or the birthday girl is expected “to cut the cake.”  Why is that ?

The birthday is the day of days, when the individual can truly celebrate the anniversary of their birth into this world.  It is the one time every year, when every man, woman and child should be respected as one of “God’s unique gifts to the Universe.”  While family and friends usually do try to honor the person, the glitch always seems to come at cake time.  Instead of a family member or friend stepping up from the ranks to do the honor, the birthday boy or birthday girl is usually left positioned behind the cake to decide how to cut if, while the fate of the Free World and human civilization hangs in the balance.

Someone hands them a knife, and leaves the birthday boy or birthday girl to decide, “How do I cut the cake ?”

On my birthday, I always smile, step back and would hand the knife to my mother, Cousin Donna, or my wife, Christy, and reply, “I do a lousy job of cutting a cake.”  I knew my talents in life did not include cake cutting, thus, one of my trusted love ones had to have a more precise skill of cake cutting than I would ever master.

In my experience, most people usually stand there bewildered until some hungry family member takes pity and decides to step up to assist.  I am no protocol person, but on someone’s special day, the goal is to honor and celebrate their birthday.  Thus, it should already be decided long before the traditional song is sung, who will step up to assume command of “The Cutting Of The Cake.”

Point Number Two

Most often a Wedding is an expensive personal ceremony that ranks right up their with Presidential Ignauration Ceremonies.  All the planning, pomp and circumstance goes into planning weddings as though it were a re-enactment of “The D-Day Landing.”  After the traditional “cutesie moment” of the bride “smushing” cake into her new husband’s face and him doing likewise to his new wife, then, the marvelous machinery of the wedding celebration rockets into high gear and the wedding cake is quickly distributed to the masses.

Unfortunately, Birthday Celebrations are sometimes one of those “Fly By The Seat Of Your Pants” events that suggests you are making it up as you go along.  The best birthday celebrations always seem to collapse like a fallen cake at serving time.  One reason maybe the absence of the ingenious device – “The Cake Server” – a utensil shaped like a pizza slice with a laid back L shaped handle that allows the utensil to slide in under the cake and raise it triumphantly in one piece up into the atmosphere.

Without the cake server, people’s stomachs always override their sense of logistics and spoons and forks are stabbed at the cake like prehistoric cave people trying to free the charbroiled dinosaur bone from the family flame pit.  It is a given, that the piece of cake will wobble and collapse like a badly constructed tower, near, and sometimes actually in the plate.  My solution is to use a knife and a fork or spoon to actually “balance” the piece of cake to the nearby plate.  My crude forklift tactic usually prevents the cake from becoming a Tower of Babble re-enactment.

The Royal Imperial Professional College of Birthday Cake Taste Testers — of any country is kids. The Saldana and Roa kids enjoyment of The Good Morning Bakery of Palo’s birthday cake quickly attained a positive five-star rating from the M &Ms, to the vanilla flavor and the icing. Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Of course, Marife and Randy’s birthday party went off without a hitch because Christy Warren is a natural born protocol officer.  I suspect my wife must have been a protocol officer at a Royal European Court in one of her past lives.

Thus, when it came time to blow out the candles Marife and Randy made their wishes and blew out the candles.

The Birthday Dignitaries – Marife Saldana Roa and Randy Abano gather around the birthday cake, while Ann Ann Natividad watches in the background. Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Happy Birthday, Marife ! Happy Birthday, Randy !

Sam

The Crucifixion ! Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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The Crucifixion !

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Soldiers Stand Guard – Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr. Filipino citizens assume the roles of Roman soldiers and stand guard at the crucifixion site on the grounds of the Metropolitan Chapel in Palo, Leyte, during Good Friday’s Holy Week observances.  Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Mourners Approach – Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.   A raised mound in the courtyard of the Metropolitan Cathedral in Palo, Leyte serves as the site of the three crosses.  Statues on the crosses enhance the eerie feeling of realism.  The soldiers stand their post as people dressed as mourners approach the three crosses.  People who attended the Good Friday observance were able to watch the re-creation of the crucifixion, during the Holy Week observance.  Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

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Crucifixion Cadre – Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.  Citizens assume the role of the Roman soldiers of the Crucifixion Cadre.  The citizen-soldiers’ acting abilities enhanced the experience of witnessing the Good Friday, Holy Week observance on the grounds of the Metropolitan Cathedral in Palo, Leyte.  Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

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Witness to the Crucifixion – Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.  People who attended the Good Friday observance at the Metropolitan Chapel, in Palo, Leyte, were witnesses to this choreographed crucifixion.  The significance of the ritual symbolism, could best be described, as the emotional feelings of the individual — within the multitude of witnesses.  Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Sermon to the Masses–Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Sermon to the Masses – Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.  People make the pilgrimage through the gates of the Metropolitan Cathedral in Palo.  In the courtyard, people gather to witness a modern day display of the crucifixion, during the Good Friday observance.  Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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