Sam I Am Blog

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Posts Tagged ‘Filipino

Flip Flop Pitchers’ Contest Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Flip Flop Pitchers’ Contest

Elyza Tanahale dashes to claim her “Flip Flop.” Ranyiel Saldana, Elyza’s cousin watches in the background and awaits his turn.

Children have a knack for finding a way to entertain themselves. When Elyza, her brothers, sisters and cousins got together New Year’s Day in Barangay Baras, Leyte in the Republic of the Philippines, they found a way to entertain themselves.

“Flip Flop” is the nickname given to sandal footwear in the Philippines. Many of the “flip flops” that children and adults wear are the basic “shower clogs” that Americans wear getting into and out of the shower.

 

My Cousin, Bill DeLong, had a reputation in the DeLong Family of being a champion horseshoe pitcher.

 

My Filipino and Filipina, nephews and nieces “flip flop” pitching is basically the idea of horseshoe pitching, which is a popular past time sport in the United States. Instead of stakes, my nephews and nieces placed an empty tin can several yards away from the starting point.

Nikon Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Links

National Horseshoe Pitchers’ Association of America

http://www.horseshoepitching.com/

 

Horseshoes Wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horseshoes

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons license.

I Envy United States Army General Douglas MacArthur Editorial

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I Envy

United States

Army

General

Douglas MacArthur

UNITED STATES GENERAL OF THE ARMY DOUGLAS MAC ARTHUR_army.mil-59621-2009-12-22-131255

United States Army

General of the Army Douglas MacArthur

Promoted to "Five-Star" rank , December 18, 1944. Supreme Commander of Allied Forces in the Southwest Pacific Area. U. S. Army Signal Corps Photograph.

by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

World War I , in the 20th Century, taught the Citizens Of The World that War is Hell On Earth and no nation or person is “neutral.” World War I proved that War had evolved from nations with disagreements to a force that engulfs the world in a matter of days or hours.

 

World War II, in the 20th Century, taught the Citizens Of The World, Hell On Earth is always just aMV5BMTkzMDQxNzEyMl5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTcwMjcxMTAyMQ@@._V1._SX333_SY475_ heartbeat away.

 

The DVD cover shows Actor Gregory Peck in the role of General Douglas

MacArthur in the 1977 movie, “Mac Arthur.”

World War II divided the nations of the world into Us versus Them. World War II confirmed that any War, like fire, can quickly spread and engulf nations in a global holocaust that consumes everything in it’s path.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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World War II’s Gift: The A Bomb is the constant reminder that when nations do not deal with issues, then, a violent force will always wait in the wings to settle those issues.

 

The A Bomb and nuclear weapons are not the threat – they are the reminder that when War becomes a global inferno, then, an Armageddon event is needed to end the War.

 

Every generation forgets or fails to learn : “The Eternal Lesson Of War is Hell On Earth demands you to find the courage to survive the death and destruction around you to survive and live your life.”

 

______________________________________________________

 

The U.S. Army’s Philippine Scouts

These were General Douglas MacArthur’s soldiers—the guys who fought America’s first battle of World War II. The Philippine Division. Probably the best trained and possibly the best prepared U.S. Army division at the outset of the war.”

Quote is the lead paragraph for the story on

The U.S. Army website

 

220px-12th_Infantry_Division_SSI.svg

Shoulder sleeve insignia of the United States Army’s Philippine Division, 12th Infantry Division. The head of the water buffalo symbolizes the Philippines. The colors red and gold represent the island’s Spanish colonial roots.

______________________________________________________

 

 

In my lifetime, there has hardly been a day, when I did not pick up a newspaper, turn on the radio or TV or log on to the Internet to read about, yet, another – War.

 

War is eternal.

 

War is inevitable.

 

War is a major event of Human Life.

 

When The Citizens Of The World forget or ignore The Lessons Of War, then, the next War is only mere seconds away.

 

The Korean War happened too quickly after World War II for people to understand that World War II was the global event that should of taught The Citizens Of The World that War can be “The Extinction Event For Human Life.”

 

I admire the American Generals And Admirals of World War II because they knew there had to be a way to quickly end the global pain and suffering. Those military leaders and their troops fought to find a way.

 

I salute General Eisenhower, General Patton, General MacArthur, all the Allies military commanders and troops for the courage it took for them to wage the battles and campaigns needed to end World War II.

 

October 20, 2012 was the 68th Anniversary of the Leyte Landing. October 20, 1944, United States General of The Army Douglas MacArthur and Filipino leaders waded ashore at Palo, Leyte, near Tacloban City, Republic of the Philippines to begin the Liberation Of The Philippines.

 

Meanwhile, the Allies forces were gearing up in the waters of the Pacific for The Battle Of Leyte Gulf, which would become, “The Greatest Naval Battle In The History Of Global Naval Warfare,” in terms of the men, munitions, planes, bombs and ships available to be used to fight a battle at sea.

 

To date, “The Battle Of Leyte Gulf Is The Largest Naval Battle In The History Of The World.” The battle raged in the waters off the Philippine islands of Leyte and Samar from October 23 through October 26, 1944.

 

I have always envied General MacArthur because he kept his promise and set free a Pacific nation from the grip of a sadistic tyrant – Emperor Hirohito.

 

Sam

MONUMENT

TO THE

FILIPINO SOLDIER

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Nikon D 100 Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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World War II Battle Of Leyte Gulf Links

 

 

  Leyte Samar Daily Express

http://leytesamardaily.net/2012/10/simple-memorable-celebrations-mark-68th-leyte-gulf-landings/

 

The 68th Leyte Gulf Landing Anniversary:

A Celebration of Victory

http://antacloban.wordpress.com/2012/10/18/the-68th-leyte-gulf-landing-anniversary-a-celebration-of-victory/

Tourism office calls on Leyteños to set up wartime museum

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/tacloban/local-news/2012/10/17/tourism-office-calls-leytenos-set-wartime-museum-248511

 

Battle Of Leyte Gulf

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Leyte_Gulf

 

US Army Center Of Military History Battle Of Leyte Gulf

http://www.history.army.mil/brochures/leyte/leyte.htm

The U.S. Army’s Philippine Scouts

http://www.army.mil/asianpacificsoldiers/history/phillipineScouts.html

Philippine Scouts Heritage Society

http://www.philippine-scouts.org/

Forgotten Soldiers’ – The Philippine Scouts

http://www.armchairgeneral.com/forgotten-soldiers-the-philippine-scouts.htm

 

US Navy – Naval History And Heritage Command

http://www.history.navy.mil/

 

US Marine Corps History Division

http://edm-sepublic.documentservices.dla.mil/USMC_Oral_History/

 

US Coast Guard Historian’s Office Battle Of Leyte Gulf

http://www.uscg.mil/global/search/default.asp

 

U.S. Merchant Marine in World War II

http://www.usmm.org/ww2.html

US Navy Ship – USS Leyte Gulf (CG-55)

http://www.public.navy.mil/surflant/cg55/Pages/default.aspx

World War 2 Facts

Information and Facts on the Great War

Battle of Leyte Gulf

http://www.worldwar2facts.org/battle-of-leyte-gulf.html

Ahoy – Mac’s Web Log

Naval, Maritime, Australian History and more

Mackenzie J Gregory

http://ahoy.tk-jk.net/macslog/BattleofLeyteGulf.23-26Oc.html

Military History Online.Com

The Battle for Leyte Gulf Revisited
by Irwin J. Kappes

http://www.militaryhistoryonline.com/wwii/articles/leytegulfrevisited.aspx

Mabuhay Tacloban City

Monument To The Filipino Soldier

http://www.tourisminthephilippines.com/city/Tacloban/historical-places/tacloban-monument-filipino-soldier-palo-picture-01.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons license.

” Extreme Fixer Upper ” — Photo for Katie — Photography Patrol

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” Extreme Fixer Upper ” — Photo for Katie — Take a camera and take a walk, sometimes you might be amazed at the sights you find near your front door. July 15, 2012 — I took the Nikon D 100 and strolled down the road. A few yards down the Barangay Baras Road from my front door at One Warren Way is this former Filipino bamboo home.
I saw this building and thought of my favorite American realtor, Katie. For three years, in the United States, my wife, Christy Warren and I used the Internet and I went to numerous websites trying to sell the more than 70 acres of Warren Land in rural southwest Missouri. We even listed the property with two other realtors and one realtor was a national American real estate firm.
Yet, it was a third generation Stone County, Missouri native, Katie Philipps of Tri-Lakes Realtors, who helped us to find a “buyer” and close the deal in less than three months Thanks to Katie, Our Favorite American Real Estate Agent, Christy and I are now living “Our American Dream” on the island of Leyte, in the Republic of The Philippines.  Nikon D 100 Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

Wingman To The Angels

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Wingman

To The

Angels

By Samuel E. Warren Jr.

I can die a happy man !

I don’t have a son.

I don’t have a grandson.

I had the honor of any father or grandfather, as I stood and walk alongside my nephew in his commencement exercise.

“What Mothers Do” – Lanail Saldana holds a graduation gown, while Marife Saldana Roa, the mother of Glen Roa, checks the precise alignment of the flower on her son, Glen’s graduation gown before commencement exercises. Canon 40 D Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

I walked alongside my nephew, Glen Roa, on the day that he underwent a monumental turning point in his life.

March 29, 2012, I strolled alongside my nephew, Glen Roa, in his formal graduation procession of the Juan Villablanca National High School, in Pastrana, in the Republic of the Philippines.

The joy inside my heart, mind and soul, I describe as, being promoted to the rank of “Seraphim” and given the opportunity to fly Combat Air Patrol off of the left wing of Saint Michael, the Archangel.

As a writer, monumental moments in my life, I always put on paper or place in my electronic journals, the “Sam I Am Blog” and my “Samuel Warren The Writer” blog.

A writer feels emotions like his fellow man and fellow woman, but, a writer has the passion to translate that emotion into words and to commit it to print for future generations.

For me, walking alongside Glen in his commencement exercise gave me a supreme sensation of pride that could only be explained as being assigned to the military ranks of the Heavenly Host.

What greater tribute could there be in the Afterlife for a military man or woman than to be designated a “Seraphim” and authorized to fly alongside the Archangels ?

I am not a religious man. I try to be a spiritual man.

This event, gave me, the Pride, to feel like I had the honor to serve: as “Wingman To The Angels.”

“The Walk” — Samuel E. Warren Jr., strolls alongside, Glen Roa, his nephew, in the formal procession on Glen’s Graduation Day. Canon EOS 40 D Photo by Christy Warren.

The nature of the ceremony, obviously, made the day a monumental moment in Glen’s life.

The day was obviously – “Glen’s Day.”

Glen Roa accepts Communion at the church, before joining his fellow students in the formal graduation procession to the auditorium. Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

However, Glen’s American uncle felt the tremendous positive energy flowing from the universe into the graduates, their parents and relatives.

A magnificent, positive energy that reminds people, you can change the world, you can move mountains. You simply need the faith in yourself and your convictions to move you along the path to greatness.

I stood next to Glen and felt like one of God’s Seraphim standing on a majestic mountain peak bathed in golden sunlight. The rays of the sun, moved along my angelic breastplate and tunic. My wings opened to the sunlight. I stood ready to serve in the immortal ranks of The Heavenly Host.”

My feet stood in the Real World on the soil of the Republic of the Philippines, but, my imagination takes flight. I draw my sword and spread my wings. At altitude, I bank in the sunlight and fly through the ranks of the seraphim. I soar and sail among the formation of the archangels and move into position to fly off the left wing of Saint Michael, the Archangel.

Today, I am Saint Michael’s Wingman.

Back in the Real World, I stand alongside Glen. The sweltering heat and sunlight reaches the point that it is uncomfortable to just be standing outside. Yet, Glen stands in the long white line of students selected to graduate.

“The Long White Line ” — boys and girls in caps and gowns move along the route of the commencement exercise procession toward the goal of graduate. Photo by Christy Warren.

I have always been a persistent, passionate writer. When I pick up my camera for a news or important photography situation, I enter my Michelangelo mindset and try to figure out how I will be able to capture a photo that will remain a moving work of art to stand the test of time. The photography mindset is never a conscious act as much as a mental urge to be in the right place, at the right time, to capture a moment of history to stand the test of time.

My calling in life had always been to be the best reporter and photographer that it is humanly possible for me to be.

My writer’s mind, tells me God and Saint Michael, took the necessary actions to move me to this point in time.

In November 1988, I reported to Clark Air Base, Republic of the Philippines. I was a single American G.I., in pursuit of the dream of earning a Pulitzer Prize for writing or photography. Born a Texan and raised an Ozarks country boy, my ambition in life was to be a world-renowned photojournalist.

Life is an assignment that takes a serious of missions to put you in the right position to attain success and contentment. On duty, in the Real World, the United States Air Force would issue orders that would take Christy and I to Japan, Alabama and finally to retirement in Missouri.

Mount Pinatubo’s noxious sulfur fumes had changed the blanket of air over Clark Air Base into the pungent, persistent, almost choking stench of “rotten eggs.”

The slight shudder of the earth beneath your feet in February had grown to an intensity that seemed Mother Earth was being racked with strong contractions like a woman in labor by the month of May.

Before the rebirth of Mount Pinatubo into a volcano, Christy and I had taken the military orders and landed in Japan.

Mount Pinatubo had been nature’s “bunker buster bomb blast” that severed all Real World communications between Christy and her family in the Republic of the Philippines.

The status of all Christy’s relatives were “Unknown” – Missing In Action.

In a matter of days, Mount Pinatubo had devastated a section of a nation with a force usually displayed by nations at war.

And, the aftermath of Mount Pinatubo’s action, took 21 years for Christy to finally locate and determine the fate of her family in the Philippines. Marife and Ramon had had their own families.

With communications reestablished the Warrens in the United States and the Saldanas in the Philippines were becoming a family separated by a body of water called the Pacific Ocean.

Like United States Army General Douglas MacArthur, Christy Warren was determined to “Return To The Philippines.” General MacArthur had a mission. Christy Warren had family in the Philippines.

Glen adjusts his robe and straightens his mortarboard graduation cap, I smile and realize that at last Life had brought us to this point.

Glen, the young man, had grown up hearing stories about his “Tita Christy and Tito Sam.” Since our return to the Philippines, he had seen we were not fictional characters, but real people.

My grandfather, Joseph Samuel Warren, had been an East Texas farmer. My father, Samuel E. Warren, had served in the European Theater of Operations and the Pacific Theater of Operations, during World War II. Dad had earned two Silver Stars and assigned to the United States Army Signal Corps had installed some of the first telephone lines through the jungles of the Republic of the Philippines, during the war.

Glen had told his mom, he wanted to join the military. I hope the stories of my dad’s military service had inspired Glen to understand that military service is a calling of patriotism and compassionate devotion to one’s fellow citizens.

Glen’s confident smile reminded me of my exciting days at Clark Air Base back in the late 1980s. I looked at Glen and was reminded of General Fidel V. Ramos. I had been fortunate enough to take a photo of General Ramos on one of his visits to Clark.

When I arrived at Clark in the 1980s, I landed in the Philippines in the aftermath of the EDSA People Power Revolution and it was an exciting time.

The Global News Media had labeled former President Ferdinand Marcos an “evil dictatorial strongman.” Since President Marcos had always been a reliable and devoted ally to the United States Government in the Pacific and Asia, people in the Philippines were suspicious of the United States Government and most all Americans.

Life in the Philippines had became a constant topic for the global news media. Since the revolution in 1986, the world watched to see what would happen in the Philippines.

Corazon Aquino, a housewife and widow, had become the President of the Republic of the Philippines. While President Aquino had been educated for a few years in the United States, Americans as a rule, really knew nothing about the new president.

At Clark, we performed out military duties and wondered if we would get orders to pack up and head for “home” – the United States. In 1988 and 1989, I went to work each day in a country that was in transition as a new government established itself. It seemed everyday the international news media had stories of political intrigue originating from the Philippines.  Americans back home in the United States were confused about the news coming out of the Philippines. 

Every couple of weeks I would call my mother back in the United States, who would usually be upset because she had seen television coverage about the actions of the New People’s Army and had seen on television and in newspapers the coverage of protests demanding “Get US troops out of the Philippines” and, of course, the television footage was always shot outside of Clark or Subic on the days that protestors showed up, a few minutes before the global news media arrived with their television cameras and radio microphones.

I remember seeing a photo of General Juan Ponce Enrile, in uniform, on the cover of “Time” magazine. Despite the news going on around us at Clark, the names of two prominent Filipino generals always seemed to emerge in a positive light: General Juan Ponce Enrile and General Fidel Ramos.

I looked at my nephew, Glen and wondered if he would rise in life to have the admiration and respect of his comrades in arms like General Fidel Ramos. Then, we began walking in the procession toward the auditorium.

In my writer’s mind I had been elevated to the position of “Wingman To The Angels.” In the Real World, my nephew, Glen walked the symbolic pathway that led him through the doorway to decide which path he would take in life.

Glen Roa, steps to center stage, during his commencement exercises to accept his diploma. Samuel E. Warren Jr., his uncle. crosses behind him to stand beside him on the stage. Canon EOS 40 D Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

He stepped on to the stage and bowed to the audience.

I stood at his side and bowed.

As we stepped off the stage, I was confident, that Glen would be a young man, who would make a name for himself, and serve his fellow citizens.

To the reporters of “USA Today,” the “New York Times,” the “Washington Post,” “Time,” “Newsweek,” the “Manila Bulletin,” the “Philippine Daily Inquirer” the “Philippine Star,” Reuters and the Associated Press, I would suggest, “Get your cameras ready,” my nephew, Glen Roa, is a young man, who will make headlines and history.

Congratulation, Glen !

Written by samwarren55

May 26, 2012 at 10:52 PM

Posted in Bloggers, Blogs, Current Events, Editorial, Family, Leyte, Observances, Philippines, Photos, Tourism, Tropics, Vacation

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Photography Patrol–Lumpia Making In The Province–Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Lumpia Making In The Province – Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.  Pina Gempis reaches into the shopping bag.  Leneil Saldana straightens the ingredients on the spoon.  Vergie Saldana takes a banana break.  Analyn rolls a lumpia wrapper, while Endoy reaches for the lumpia ingredients with a spoon.  Edwin Saldana watches and smiles.  Lumpia is a Filipino favorite that is like a burrito or an egg roll.  Christy Warren and the Saldana women all have their recopies for making lumpia, which can be a time-consuming process.  However, once the lumpia is rolled, it can be placed in the ice box until it is time to cook.  Lumpia is a great snack and with fried rice can make for a complete meal.  The Saldana women and their male recruits rolled the lumpia as one of the foods to be served, during this Holy Week.  Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Lumpia Ready To Cook – Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.  This plate of lumpia is ready to cook.  What makes lumpia preparation time consuming is the chopping up of the ingredients like carrots, onions, bell pepper, and pork.  Lumpia wrapper tend to be extremely thin, thus, the wrappers stick together quite easily and you have to have patience to carefully separate the wrappers from each other.  In the States, when Christy could not find lumpia wrappers, she would use egg roll wrappers, which also work well.  Once the lumpia is wrapped, it simply has to be cooked.  The cooking process is more like frying, but the lumpia rolls turn out to be a crispy, delicious, golden brown.  No doubt there are many places on the World Wide Web were you can find a lumpia recipe, but if you want Christy’s Lumpia Recipe, then, you will have to email me at samuelwarren55@gmail.com  Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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The Crucifixion ! Photos by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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The Crucifixion !

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Soldiers Stand Guard – Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr. Filipino citizens assume the roles of Roman soldiers and stand guard at the crucifixion site on the grounds of the Metropolitan Chapel in Palo, Leyte, during Good Friday’s Holy Week observances.  Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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Mourners Approach – Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.   A raised mound in the courtyard of the Metropolitan Cathedral in Palo, Leyte serves as the site of the three crosses.  Statues on the crosses enhance the eerie feeling of realism.  The soldiers stand their post as people dressed as mourners approach the three crosses.  People who attended the Good Friday observance were able to watch the re-creation of the crucifixion, during the Holy Week observance.  Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

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Crucifixion Cadre – Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.  Citizens assume the role of the Roman soldiers of the Crucifixion Cadre.  The citizen-soldiers’ acting abilities enhanced the experience of witnessing the Good Friday, Holy Week observance on the grounds of the Metropolitan Cathedral in Palo, Leyte.  Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

 

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Witness to the Crucifixion – Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.  People who attended the Good Friday observance at the Metropolitan Chapel, in Palo, Leyte, were witnesses to this choreographed crucifixion.  The significance of the ritual symbolism, could best be described, as the emotional feelings of the individual — within the multitude of witnesses.  Photo by Samuel E. Warren Jr.

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